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Get the latest news on AWLQ and the animal welfare industry. If you would like more news and information please contact our media team.


TREAT YOURSELF TO A NEW COMPANION THIS HOWWWLLOWEEN

25th October 2019 - For Immediate Use

  • Cats/kittens will be reduced from $183 to $29.
  • Dogs/puppies will be reduced from $392 to $99.
  • Sale is on from 25-31 October 2019 at the Brisbane Animal Rehoming Centres.
  • Check for tips on keeping your pet safe during Halloween.

Brisbane’s Animal Rehoming Centres are bringing you a seven day Halloween adoption sale, with reduced adoption fees, in an effort to rehome homeless animals.

This sale encourages anyone who is ready for a furry new family member to visit the Brisbane Animal Rehoming Centres and meet the animals who are waiting for a second chance at happiness.

For families who have decided the time is right for a new pet, cats/kittens will be reduced from $183 to $29 and dogs/puppies from $392 to $99 during the seven day adoption sale.

With the weather warming up, the Animal Rehoming Centres will soon be seeing an influx of animals, so every animal that is rehomed provides a space for another in need.

“We hope this promotion will provide an extra incentive to visit the Rehoming Centres and choose the rewarding experience of adopting a homeless animal” said Ms Phipps (Animal Welfare League Queensland [AWLQ] State Rehoming Manager).

While we will be celebrating Halloween with an adoption sale, Halloween is also a time to exercise caution when it comes to your pets. Even though the rest of your family might be caught up in all the festivities, your pet still needs a routine that includes all of their activities.

Following these simple tips will help to keep your pets safe, healthy and out of any scary trouble this Halloween:

  • Be sure your pet is wearing identification tags and their microchip details are up-to-date, in case they escape through the open door while you’re distracted with trick-or-treaters.
  • Don’t leave pets outside on Halloween as this may place them and trick-or-treaters at risk. A constant stream of people in strange clothes may cause your pet to become stressed and want to escape.
  • Don’t feed your pets Halloween lollies, especially if they contain chocolate or sugar substitutes as these can be poisonous.
  • If you are using candles to light your jack-o-lanterns or other Halloween decorations, make sure to place them well out of reach of your pets.
  • Keep glow sticks and glow jewellery away from your pets. Although the liquid in these products isn’t likely toxic, it tastes really bad and makes pets salivate excessively and act strangely.
  • Confine your pet in their own safe haven for the evening to prevent them from barking excessively or running out of the constantly opening front door.

Council’s standard adoption processes still apply and all cats and dogs are desexed, microchipped, vaccinated and wormed. Brisbane has two  Animal Rehoming Centres:

  • Warra Animal Rehoming Centre, 523 Telegraph Road, Bracken Ridge
  • Willawong Animal Rehoming Centre, 501 Gooderham Road, Willawong.

The Halloween Sale runs from 25 – 31 October 2019 (weekdays - 12pm to 6pm and weekends - 10am to 3pm). Head online to see the animals available for adoption - www.awlqld.com.au/adopt-a-pet.

Download a copy of AWLQ's Keeping your pet safe during Halloween brochure here.

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


plans to develop greyhound complex a step in the wrong direction

18th October 2019 - For Immediate Use

Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) is disappointed to learn that the Palaszczuk Government has committed $40 million towards the building of a new greyhound racing complex near Ipswich, claiming it will revitalise and transform the industry.

Denise Bradley, AWLQ Chief Executive Officer, said at a time when the rest of the world is looking to end the cruel practice, Queensland State Government and industry representatives are supporting it.

“It is devastating news and a retrograde step for the future of greyhounds. Australia is one of only eight countries in the world where greyhounds still race, and die in large numbers and under unacceptable conditions,” said Ms Bradley.

Despite the claim from Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe, that the Government has consulted with experts at length and animal welfare will be at the core of the design and construction of the venue, AWLQ is urging the Palaszczuk Government to reconsider this decision.

“These animals are bred for no other purpose than to race and win. Every year in Australia approximately 20,000 greyhound pups are born with the sole purpose of making their owner money. Up to 17,000 healthy greyhounds are killed each year and thousands of dogs retired from racing will die simply because they are too slow to win.

“Due to a myriad of welfare and social issues associated with greyhound racing as well as the killing of large numbers of dogs deemed unprofitable either before or after a career in racing, AWLQ urges a ban on greyhound racing in Australia,” said Ms Bradley.

The greyhounds that do make it to the track are put at significant risk of sustaining serious injuries, such as broken bones or head trauma during training and racing. Some even die from cardiac arrest due to the extreme physical intensity of racing. On many occasions the injuries are deemed uneconomical to treat and the dog will be killed. Off the track their lives are typically no better with the dogs being kept in pens or kennels for the majority of their lives and only released to train or race.

AWLQ has a long association with ex-racing greyhounds, their care and rehoming and we want to ensure that they have the best start in their new lives.

“These animals arrive into AWLQ’s care in a traumatised state, they have never experienced the joys of being a companion and living in a loving home. Many of them have never negotiated steps, have no understanding of glass doors and are anxious around people,” said Ms Bradley.

In 2016 AWLQ launched a program dedicated to the rehoming of greyhounds called ‘Going Grey’ – this program is designed to rehabilitate greyhounds to household living. Specifically trained foster carers dedicate their time and open their homes to ensure these greyhounds are prepared for life after the track. The dogs get to experience what a loving home is really like.

Through their Going Grey Program, AWLQ rehomes up to 50 greyhounds annually.

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


PROTECT YOUR PET THIS TICK SEASON

14th October 2019 - For Immediate Use

  • AWLQ’s Community Vet Clinics treated 122 animals for tick paralysis during the 2018/19 tick season.
  • Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) has treated 36 animals for tick paralysis at its Gold Coast and Ipswich Community Vet Clinics since July 2019.

Every year the paralysis tick will cause illness in over 100,000 companion animals on the east coast of Australia. Paralysis ticks are external parasites that suck the blood from their host animal. Their salivary glands produce a toxin that affects the nervous system of the host.

Dr Bridget Brown, Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) Senior Veterinarian, said not only is the paralysis tick one of the most common; it’s also one of the most dangerous.

“Once paralysis occurs the animal is likely to die unless it is treated quickly with tick antiserum transfused by a vet. Despite treatment your pet can continue to deteriorate as the toxin is metabolised,” said Dr Brown.

Ticks need humidity and mild weather to develop and aren’t able to survive in cold climates. They are most commonly found along the east coast of Australia during the warmer months, but can be found inland in suitable habitats and in northern parts of the country all-year-round. Ticks vary in size between 1mm and 10mm long, depending on their age. They look like tiny spiders with a white, egg-shaped body. This body becomes larger and darker as it fills with blood.

To reduce the chances of your pet being affected by tick paralysis AWLQ recommends pet owners utilise a tick treatment that will either repel ticks or kill them if they attach.

“Spot on treatments, tablets and collars are available and it’s best to consult your vet about which is most suitable for your pet. Read the instructions very carefully as some treatments are for dogs only and can be very dangerous to cats and can even kill them.

“While these products act as a preventative, there is no guarantee they will protect your pet 100% of the time and the best way to protect your pet is to check them daily.

“Begin with their head and remember that you’re more likely to feel the tick than see it, so make sure you use your hands. Check inside your pet’s ears, nose, and mouth, under their chin and around their throat. Move down the front legs and check in between their toes. Feel along their body making sure to check their belly, and then check down their back legs and in between their toes. Inspect your pet’s genital region as ticks can sometimes be found there and finish with their tail,” said Dr Brown.

If your pet has come into contact with a paralysis tick they will experience paralysis in a variety of forms. A typical case will start with a weakness in the hindquarters that will then progress to total paralysis of all four legs.

“Other early symptoms may include the difficulty breathing, loss of appetite, vomiting or dry retching, excessive salivation, difficulty swallowing, coughing or noisy panting

“Paralysis ticks can lead to an animal needing to be ventilated and sadly many victims of these ticks do not recover. If your pet is showing any signs of tick paralysis, you should take him/her to a veterinarian for treatment promptly.

“If you suspect that your dog or cat has tick paralysis you can reduce the risk of complications by withholding food and water before you can see a veterinarian. This is especially important if the dog or cat is regurgitating,” said Dr Brown.

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


HELP KEEP TAILS WAGGING THIS WORLD ANIMAL DAY

27th September 2019 - For Immediate Use

  • AWLQ encourages the community to help keep tails wagging by taking action on World Animal Day.
  • This World Animal Day AWLQ are hoping to raise $60,000 to purchase two custom fitted vehicles.
  • Support AWLQ’s Beach Walking fundraiser by donating at awlqld.com.au.

World Animal Day is a social movement charged with the mission of raising the status of animals in order to improve welfare standards around the globe. World Animal Day is an international day of action for animal rights and welfare celebrated annually on October 4, the feast day of Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals.

Every week dedicated volunteers head to the beach with a group of abandoned and homeless canine companions in tow as part of AWLQ’s Beach Walking Program – our shelter dogs get to feel the wind in their fur, the sand between their toes, run on grass, experience new smells, and, to simply take a break from the shelter environment.

Melinda Phipps, AWLQ State Rehoming Manager, said the joy they experience at spending time at the beach is breathtaking to see and means so much, both to them and our volunteer carers.

“Shelter life can be stressful and the dogs are provided time away from the shelter. They go swimming, play in the waves, there is lots of goofing around and playing in the sand – the volunteers give them loads of love and teach them really neat tricks.

“During their adventure they get to burn excess energy with exercise and mingle with their furry companions. But most importantly they get to relax, destress and learn behaviours that prepare them for their new home,” said Ms Phipps.

None of this is possible without AWLQ’s trusty Beach Walking Program vans, but they’ve seen better days.

With the community’s support this World Animal Day, AWLQ are hoping to raise $60,000 to purchase two custom fitted vehicles so we can continue to transport dogs on these adventures and keep their tails wagging.

“Since 2003, when AWLQ started the Beach Walking Program, thousands of dogs have experienced the benefits of this program, enrichment that is critical for the well-being of abandoned and homeless dogs in care, but now the AWLQ Beach Walking Program vans are in desperate need of replacing,” said Ms Phipps.

AWLQ are encouraging the community to put the wheels in motion and support AWLQ’s Beach Walking Program by making a donation at www.awlqld.com.au.

We've included some uncontrollable tail wagging, wiggles, leaps and bounds for you.

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


animal welfare league queensland supports amended animal cruelty laws

17th September 2019 - For Immediate Use

Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) supports the Queensland Governments decision to amend laws to make it clear that it is illegal to leave an animal in a car in temperatures that could cause it harm.

Dr. Bridget Brown, AWLQ Senior Veterinarian, said every year across Queensland dogs suffer and die when their carers make the mistake of leaving them in a parked car, even for a short period of time.

“While leaving car windows down on an unattended vehicle is illegal in Queensland, under the current Animal Care and Protection Act, there is no specific offence for leaving a dog in a car, or on the back of a ute.

“AWLQ supports any change in legislation that will benefit and improve the welfare of animals in Queensland,” said Dr. Brown.

Research suggests on a 20 degree day it takes just 10 minutes for the temperature in a car to more than double to 44 degrees. Queensland has an average year round temperature of approximately 29°C; this means dogs are at higher risk from suffering fatal heat stroke in Queensland than in other State.

“Cars can be a death trap for dogs – they can sustain brain damage or even die from heatstroke in just 15 minutes if locked in a hot car,” said Dr. Brown.

AWLQ also hopes the amended legislation will increase awareness and improve education on this issue.

“We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but during hot weather the best advice is to leave your dog at home with plenty of water and access to cool shaded areas.

“Dogs are particularly at risk as they cool themselves by panting. If the air around them is too hot and they don’t have access to water, dogs are physically unable to regulate their body temperature,” said Dr. Brown.

As temperatures begin to increase it is also a timely reminder for pet owners to monitor their pets for heat stress added Dr Brown.

“Symptoms of overheating in pets can include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness or collapse. If you are concerned about your pet’s wellbeing, consult your veterinarian immediately.”

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


ANIMAL WELFARE LEAGUE QUEENSLAND IS URGING PET OWNERS TO PREPARE FOR LONG AND VERY ACTIVE BUSHFIRE SEASON

5th September 2019 - For Immediate Use

  • Check with local authorities as to where your nearest pet friendly refuge centre is located.
  • Know where you could house your pets as an alternative.
  • Because of the potential stress on animals relocate your pets early to a safer location.
  • Have a pet emergency kit prepared with food, water, bedding and medication.

With recent severe bushfires resulting in an early start to the season, and Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) expecting it will go later as well, Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) is urging pet owners to ensure they are prepared for the bushfire season.

Bushfires are extremely dangerous and threaten homes and lives of both humans and animals. Having a plan of action in case of an emergency, for both you and your pets, is essential to getting out alive.

Bushfires can occur in a matter of seconds, providing very little time to evacuate. With a plan in place you will know exactly how to react and what needs to be done in order to save the lives of you and your pets.

Tips for preparing for bushfire season:

  • Monitoring high fire danger days are important, as this will allow you to be prepared and ready if the worst happens. As soon as you are aware of a bushfire threat, it is important to act as quickly as possible.
  • Check with local authorities as to where your nearest pet friendly refuge centre is located. Know where you could house your pets as an alternative – this may include boarding kennels, a relative or friend’s place.
  • Because of the potential stress on animals in a major bush fire, we recommend that you relocate your pets early to a safer location.
  • Have a kit ready to go – this should include food and water, a bowl for each pet, a spare collar and lead, a carrier for cats and smaller pets, bedding and a woollen blanket, a favourite toy, any medications and your pet's medical history, including proof of vaccination.
  • Have towels and woollen blankets available to cover and protect your pets.
  • Make sure your pets can be identified easily – microchip your animals and include your details such as your phone number on collars.
  • Discuss with neighbours about protecting your pets if you are not at home during a bushfire. Keep in regular contact with your neighbours during the fire danger period to let them know your plans.
  • Practise how you will move your pets if you leave – it takes longer than you think.

If your pets have suffered injuries during a fire ensure you seek veterinary assistance as soon as it is safe to do so.

For more information visit - https://www.ruralfire.qld.gov.au/BushFire_Safety/Pages/Create-your-bushfire-survival-plan.aspx

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


HOP INTO BRISBANE’S ANIMAL REHOMING CENTRES THIS EASTER AND ADOPT A  HOMELESS ANIMAL

16 April 2019 - For Immediate Use

Brisbane’s Animal Rehoming Centres are bringing you a ten day Easter Bun-Anzer adoption drive, with reduced adoption fees, in an effort to rehome hundreds of stray and homeless animals.

Melinda Phipps, for the Animal Rehoming Centres, said the long hot summer we have experienced has resulted in an extra-long breeding season this year and the Easter Bun-Anzer adoption drive is an opportunity to choose a new family pet in time for winter.

“The Easter long-weekend provides the perfect opportunity to introduce a new companion into your family. We encourage anyone who is ready for a furry new family member to visit the Brisbane Animal Rehoming Centres and meet the animals who are waiting for a second chance,” said Ms Phipps (Animal Welfare League Queensland [AWLQ] State Rehoming Manager).

“Every animal that is rehomed provides a space for another in need of a new home, so you’re really helping two animals.”

“For families who have decided the time is right for a new pet, cats will be reduced from $178 to $29 and dogs from $382 to $99 (conditions apply) for these ten days. We hope this promotion will provide extra incentive to visit the Rehoming Centres and choose the rewarding experience of adopting a homeless animal.”

Council and AWLQ’s promise is to never euthanise a sociable, healthy or treatable domestic animal in our care. We work tirelessly to keep this promise and it is something we are very proud of. The community plays an important role in assisting us to achieve this when they choose to adopt.

Council’s standard adoption processes still apply and all cats and dogs are desexed, microchipped and vaccinated. Brisbane has two  Animal Rehoming Centres operated by AWLQ:

  • Warra Animal Rehoming Centre, Telegraph Road, Bracken Ridge
  • Willawong Animal Rehoming Centre, Gooderham Road, Willawong

The Easter Bun-Anzer runs from 17 – 26 April 2019 (weekdays - 12pm to 6pm and weekends - 10am to 3pm), with the Animal Rehoming Centres closed on Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

Head online to see the animals available for adoption - www.awlqld.com.au/adopt-a-pet

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery -  Public Relations & Communications Manager at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


ANIMAL WELFARE LEAGUE QUEENSLAND IS URGING PET OWNERS TO PREPARE FOR CYCLONE OMA

21 February 2019 - For Immediate Use

High-impact weather is expected to lash Brisbane and the Gold Coast in the coming days and Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) is urging pet owners to ensure their animals kept safe.

Melinda Phipps, AWLQ State Rehoming Manager, says the organisation sees a significant influx of lost animals coming into care when severe weather events occur.

“Pets are at higher risk of becoming lost during a storm. The sudden atmospheric  changes and loud noises associated with storms is one of the most prevalent phobias in animals, and result in many of them escaping from their properties. This then puts them at risk of injuring themselves.

“Cyclone Oma is powering up and could make landfall this weekend bringing very heavy rainfall, gale force winds to Brisbane and the Gold Coast, forecasters have warned.  The best advice we can offer pet owners is to keep their pets inside during this period.

“While there is no magic solution to prevent animals from becoming distressed during storms, there are several things owners can do to calm and protect their pets,” said Ms Phipps.

Tips for keeping your pet safe during a storm:

  • Bring pets indoors at the first sign of a storm – animals can become disoriented or try to escape the property to get away from the storm.
  • If you are not able to be home – ask a neighbour or family member to take care of your pet in the event you are unable to do so.
  • Storm phobic animals – confine them to a small space or room if you know this makes them feel safe, close the blinds so your pet can’t see outside and have music playing. You can also try a thunder coat.
  • Make sure all pets have identification – ensure your pet’s microchip details are up-to-date and they are wearing a collar and identification tag.

“Losing a pet is a very distressing time for owners. In the event your pet does go missing during a storm, check your neighbourhood as someone may have found your pet and are keeping them safe. Ensure you contact your local Council, animal shelters and vet clinics. It is also a good idea to list your pet missing on social media lost and found pages.

“This is also a very timely reminder for pet owners to make sure they have an emergency plan in place for their pets during a natural disaster,” said Ms Phipps.

For more information visit - https://www.qld.gov.au/emergency/dealing-disasters/prepare-for-disasters/prepare-pets.

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


Animal Welfare League Queensland urges pet owners to prepare for expected heatwave

18 January 2019 - For Immediate Use

With the heatwave gripping many parts of the country expected to move east and bring near-40-degree temperatures to parts of south-east Queensland by the weekend, Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) is urging pet owners to ensure their animals have somewhere cool to retreat to.

Melinda Phipps, AWLQ State Rehoming Manager, warns that unless owners take the necessary precautions, pets can rapidly suffer from heat stroke and even die on very hot days.

“It is also important to remember that dark-haired cats and dogs will absorb more heat through their fur and that light-haired dogs are more susceptible to sunburn.

“Pets that are more likely to suffer in the heat include breeds such as pugs, bulldogs, greyhounds, persians and exotic shorthairs, and any with especially thick coats,” said Ms Phipps.

According to the Bureau of Meteorology inland areas of the south-eastern corner to reach maximums in the high 30s later in the week while towns in the southern interior are bracing for tops in the 40s.

“There are several things owners can do to protect their pets. These guidelines are especially important for owners of older pets, pets with thick coats, short noses, or pets adapted to cooler climates.

“One of the most important things to remember is never to leave them in a hot place from which they cannot leave. So, never leave them locked in a room without air-conditioning or a car. Animals should not be locked in cars no matter what the weather but especially not in the heat,” said Ms Phipps.

Tips for keeping your pet safe on hot days:

  • Never leave your animals in a vehicle – even with the windows open. A parked car is like an oven and temperatures can reach extreme levels in just a short period of time leading to fatal heat stroke.
  • Pets can get dehydrated quickly – have plenty of fresh, clean water available. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful not to over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.
  • Know the symptoms of overheating in pets – this includes excessive panting or difficulty breathing, drooling, mild weakness, vomiting, or even collapse. Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke.
  • If you can’t be home seek alternative arrangements – ask your neighbour or a family member to mind your pet. If your pet is home alone, where possible, leaving the air-conditioning or fans on in the house will help to keep pets cool.
  • Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool or at the beach – not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats.
  • Don’t let your pets linger on hot pavements – when the temperature is very high and being so close to the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly. Their sensitive paw pads can burn so keep dog walks during these times to a minimum.

If you are concerned about your pet’s wellbeing, consult your veterinarian immediately. To report wildlife in distress contact 1300 264 625.

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For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.


ANIMAL WELFARE LEAGUE QUEENSLAND URGES PET OWNERS TO PREPARE FOR SIGNIFICANT WEATHER EVENT

12 December 2018 - For Immediate Use

With heavy rain and strong winds set to lash the Queensland coast in the coming days, Animal Welfare League Queensland (AWLQ) is urging pet owners to ensure their animals have somewhere secure and dry to bunker down.

Melinda Phipps, AWLQ State Rehoming Manager, says the organisation sees a significant influx of lost animals coming into care when severe storms occur.

“Pets are at higher risk of becoming lost during a storm. The sudden atmospheric  changes and loud noises associated with storms is one of the most prevalent phobias in animals, and result in many of them escaping from their properties. This then puts them at risk of injuring themselves.

“According to the Bureau of Meteorology South East Queensland can expect widespread heavy rain from Friday through until Sunday. The best advice we can offer pet owners is to keep their pets inside during this period.

“While there is no magic solution to prevent animals from becoming distressed during storms, there are several things owners can do to calm and protect their pets,” said Ms Phipps.

Tips for keeping your pet safe during a storm:

  • Bring pets indoors at the first sign of a storm – animals can become disoriented or try to escape the property to get away from the storm.
  • If you are not able to be home – ask a neighbour or family member to take care of your pet in the event you are unable to do so.
  • Storm phobic animals – confine them to a small space or room if you know this makes them feel safe, close the blinds so your pet can’t see outside and have music playing. You can also try a thunder coat.
  • Make sure all pets have identification – ensure your pet’s microchip details are up-to-date and they are wearing a collar and identification tag.

“Losing a pet is a very distressing time for owners. In the event your pet does go missing during a storm, check your neighbourhood as someone may have found your pet and are keeping them safe. Ensure you contact your local Council, animal shelters and vet clinics. It is also a good idea to list your pet missing on social media lost and found pages.

“This is also a very timely reminder for pet owners to make sure they have an emergency plan in place for their pets during a natural disaster,” said Ms Phipps.

For more information visit - https://www.qld.gov.au/emergency/dealing-disasters/prepare-for-disasters/prepare-pets.

--ENDS--

For all media enquiries please contact Craig Montgomery at AWLQ on 07 5509 9030/0424 382 727 or email communications@awlqld.com.au.